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Tiffany Li on Privacy in the Pandemic

Season 1, Ep. 614

In this episode, Tiffany C. Li, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor at Boston University School of Law and a fellow at the Yale Information Society Project, discusses her article "Privacy in Pandemic: Law, Technology, and Public Health in the Covid-19 Crisis." Li begins by identifying the many ways in which the current pandemic implicates privacy law, from testing and contract tracing to distance learning. She discusses the ways in which the law protects privacy and the ways in which many privacy values aren't fully realized. She explains why AI and other automated approaches may introduce bias issues. And she reflects on why privacy is essential to public health. Li is on Twitter at @tiffanycli.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

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