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Jordi Goodman on Attribution Norms

Season 1, Ep. 782

In this episode, Jordana R. Goodman, Assistant Professor of Law at Chicago-Kent College of Law, discusses her article "Ms. Attribution: How Authorship Credit Contributes to the Gender Gap," which is published in the Yale Journal of Law & Technology. Goodman begin by describing the "gender gap" and how it affects the practice of law. She explains how the "Matthew" and "Matilda" effects under-recognize the contributions of women in legal practice, and how lack of attribution helps perpetuate the gender gap. She describe her empirical study of attribution in patent practice. And she makes suggestions for how to increase attribution to women. Goodman is on Twitter at @Jordi_Goodman.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

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