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Jim Maloney on Nunchaku Law

Season 1, Ep. 613

In this episode, James M. Maloney, an attorney and adjunct professor at SUNY Maritime College, discusses his work on nunchaku law and the Second Amendment, as well as his career in the maritime industry. He begins by explaining what nunchaku are, how he became interested in them, and why they were illegal under New York law. He describes the circumstances of his arrest and conviction for the possession of nunchaku, and the long path to getting the New York law prohibiting nunchaku overruled. Eventually, Stephen Colbert dubbed Maloney "Professor Nunchucks." Maloney is on Twitter at @maloney_esq.

This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye.

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