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Season 1, Ep. 33

Covid-19 has been part of our everyday life for more than 2 years now. Although young people have been less threatened by Covid-19 in terms of physical well-being, they were more likely than older groups to experience financial and housing insecurity, unemployment and mental health problems. Now as states are trying to recover from the pandemic, we want to take a closer look at the role of young people in this process.

Are they spectators or stakeholders? Are their needs and voices included in national strategies and policy-making processes? 

Malwina Talik (IDM) discusses those questions with her guest Milena Stosic from the OSCE Mission to Serbia.  


Our guest recommandations:

The book: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell

The painting: What Freedom! by Ilya Repin


Reference(s) mentioned in the program: 

Research Summary: The Influence of the Covid-19 Pandemic on the Life of Young People in Serbia - KOMS

European Council of Foreign Relations: Europe's Invisible Divides

Eurofound: Impact of Covid-19 on Young People in the EU 

LinkedIn Group: Fostering more inclusive societies: youth engagement in policies, processes and programmes 


CEE - Central Europe Explained is a podcast series produced by the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, powered by Erste Group.    

Guest: Milena Stosic from the OSCE Mission to Serbia - once a youth activist and representative, psychologist, #youthmainstreaming pioneer and feminist.

Host: Malwina Talik, Research Associate IDM   

Production and editing: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate IDM 

More Episodes

6/29/2022

Two-front War

Season 1, Ep. 38
The fight for Pride and the nation in UkraineThe war in Ukraine is often framed as a struggle over Ukrainians belonging to either the East or the West. Given this, it becomes clear why especially LGBTQIA+ activists stress Ukraine’s commitment to so-called Western values. They include human rights and, in particular, the acceptance of the queer community. On the other side, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin created “traditional values” as the dominant narrative in his third presidential term. Experts state that the Kremlin constructed homophobia as geopolitics, and the war on Ukraine is the continuation of this politics by other means. Indeed, Putin even targeted the queer community in his February 24 speech, which attempts to justify the attacks on Ukraine. What are the realities for trans people in the war? Do they encounter discrimination during their flight or fight? And how has queer activist work changed within Ukraine?  Melanie Jaindl (IDM) asked these questions to Edward Reese, a queer activist and project assistant at Kyiv Pride. Edward shares their own experiences of leaving Ukraine, their opinions about gendered war narratives and explains the importance of searching for LGBTQIA+ communities in a new environment. Our guest recommendation:   The 2022 Eurovision’s winner Kalush Orchestra’s video clip Stefania, 2022 Sources about Ukraine in English:  The telegram channel Ukraine Now [English] The daily newspaper The Kyiv Independent The daily newspaper Kyiv Post The media platform Hromadske International  The twitter channel @xenasolo The Instagram account Svidomi, @svidomi_eng Looking for the queer community in Vienna? Get in touch with Queer Base. To learn more about LGBTQIA+ topics, check out our other podcasts: Pride despite Prejudice - Sarajevo's first rainbow march in 2019, with Emina Bošnjak and Emma Hontebeyrie. Nationalism in the scope of patriarchy, with Dr Elissa Helms and Chiara Maria Murgia. Guest: Edward Reese, queer activist and project assistant for Kyiv Pride. Host: Melanie Jaindl, Assistant Editor at IDM  Production and editing: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate at IDM