House of Mystery True Crime History

5/30/2020

JOE COSENTINO - DRAMA QUEEN

JOE COSENTINO was voted favorite LGBT mystery, humorous, and contemporary author of the year by the readers of Divine Magazine for Drama Queen, the first Nicky and Noah mystery. The other Nicky and Noah mysteries are: Drama Muscle (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention), Drama Cruise, Drama Luau, Drama Detective (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention), Drama Fraternity, Drama Castle (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention), Drama Dance (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention), Drama Faerie. He is also the author of the Cozzi Cove series (NineStar Press): Cozzi Cove: Bouncing Back (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention/TBR Pile Favorite Book of the Month), Cozzi Cove: Moving Forward, Cozzi Cove: Stepping Out, Cozzi Cove: New Beginning, Cozzi Cove: Happy Endings; the Dreamspinner Press novellas: In My Heart: An Infatuation & A Shooting Star (Rainbow Award Honorable Mention), The Naked Prince and Other Tales from Fairyland (with Holiday Tales from Fairyland, Rainbow Award Honorable Mention, Open Skye Book Reviews Favorite Audiobook of the Month), the Bobby and Paolo Holiday Stories: A Home for the Holiday, The Perfect Gift, The First Noel, and the Found At Last series: Finding Giorgio and Finding Armando; and the Jana Lane mysteries: Paper Doll, Porcelain Doll, Satin Doll, China Doll, Rag Doll (The Wild Rose Press). He has appeared in principal acting roles in film, television, and theatre, opposite stars such as Bruce Willis, Rosie O'Donnell, Nathan Lane, Holland Taylor, and Jason Robards. Joe is currently Chair of the Department/Professor at a college in upstate New York, and he is happily married.
5/28/2020

MITCHEL ROTH - FIRE IN THE BIG HOUSE

Mitchel P. Roth is professor of criminal justice and criminology at Sam Houston State University, Texas. He is the author or editor of many books, including A History of Crime and Punishment: Readings and Documents in Criminal Justice and Global Organized Crime: A Reference Handbook.On April 21, 1930—Easter Monday—some rags caught fire under the Ohio Penitentiary’s dry and aging wooden roof, shortly after inmates had returned to their locked cells after supper. In less than an hour, 320 men who came from all corners of Prohibition-era America and from as far away as Russia had succumbed to fire and smoke in what remains the deadliest prison disaster in United States history.Within 24 hours, moviegoers were watching Pathé’s newsreel of the fire, and in less than a week, the first iteration of the weepy ballad “Ohio Prison Fire” was released. The deaths brought urgent national and international focus to the horrifying conditions of America’s prisons (at the time of the fire, the Ohio Penitentiary was at almost three times its capacity). Yet, amid darkening world politics and the first years of the Great Depression, the fire receded from public concern.In Fire in the Big House, Mitchel P. Roth does justice to the lives of convicts and guards and puts the conflagration in the context of the rise of the Big House prison model, local and state political machinations, and American penal history and reform efforts. The result is the first comprehensive account of a tragedy whose circumstances—violent unrest, overcrowding, poorly trained and underpaid guards, unsanitary conditions, inadequate food—will be familiar to prison watchdogs today.