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The Prospect Interview

Rafael Behr: The farce of our electoral politics

As the election campaign whirrs on—media circus in tow—Prospect’s senior editor Alona Ferber is joined by Guardian columnist and author Rafael Behr to look beyond the Westminster bubble and ask: what does the Punch-and-Judy nature of our politics mean for the country, and our democracy?

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