FUTURE FOSSILS

Share

18 - JF Martel (Art, Magic, & The Terrifying Zone of Uncanny Awesomeness)

Ep. 18

This week's guest is the loquacious, thoughtful, and profound JF Martel, film-maker and author of Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice and the three-part essay Reality is Analog, about the philosophical themes lurking behind Netflix's series Stranger Things.

http://reclaimingart.com

https://www.metapsychosis.com/reality-is-analog-philosophizing-with-stranger-things-part-one/

We discuss what can and cannot be captured and communicated digitally…

The Primordial, Deep, Subrational Forms of Poetry, Madness, Excess…

“Ultimately, art does have a function: it’s to help us better navigate the infinite chaos that is reality.”

The problem of overusing or misusing Occam’s Razor

“We understand the nature of reality the moment we admit that we don’t know it…the moment we admit we CAN’T know it.”

“Every concept kind of contains its own opposite, or casts its own shadow.”

The difference between a Sign and a Symbol

Faith or Rebellion? (Patriotism or Treason?)

Azazel the Peacock Angel vs. Lucifer the Rebel Angel

Is there an ultimate reality?

“It’s really, really tough to make great art. It’s tough to make GOOD art.”

About Hollywood: “I don’t think collaboration has ever been a great friend of art.”

“The equipment is changing so fast that no one gets GOOD at anything anymore…it’s hard to MASTER anything, today. But I think we’re moving toward something better than what we’ve had.”

The old and new paradigms of film and TV production

“[Netflix is] using the digital culture we’ve developed to make great films in the way that maybe they should always be made, which is: you identify the people with vision, and you put them in charge.”

Technology: Inevitable? How Japan said no to guns for hundreds of years…

“A society that presumes that it knows the real and can dictate its course…it is doomed to failure.”

“We are finite and live in the infinite. You can’t accrue more of the infinite.”

Staying in touch with the nonhuman.

“We’re made out of forces we can’t control. But at the same time we have a certain amount of control over how conscious we are of that. And we need to become more conscious of that. And Art helps us become more conscious of that in an objective sense, and Art helps us become more conscious of that in an empirical sense…it points out areas of the Known that need to be reconnected to the Unknown.”

How to be an esoteric workaday dad mystic artist weirdo

“I think we need to become more religious…I mean in tune with that transcendent, imminent Thing.”

“Once your roots go down infinitely, you have LICENSE to love iPhones.”

“We’d buy stuff, we’d put it in the movie, and then we’d return it intact. I felt like we were doing real alchemy…”

Michael tells one of his most bizarre and curious accounts, of a haunted camera acquired by pranking a corporation…

“Infinite meaning is tantamount to meaninglessness.”

“Artistic creation is fundamentally dangerous, in the sense that you’re moving out of the Terra Firma of the known into areas that are unknown, or you’re looking at things from an angle that’s alien to the perspective you inherited from your tribe or your culture. So there’s a REASON why so many artists end up fucked up or dying horrible deaths…I think there’s a fundamental danger that we need to recognize, especially as we enter into projects or creations that are actually visionary, that are actually pushing into something.”

“I think you can allow for quite a bit of synchronicity to enter your life, as long as you can handle it.”

“All you have to do is read Van Gogh’s biography, and you can ask…was it worth it? I think it was worth it. Maybe there’s a notion here of sacrifice. Maybe certain people are so willing to go out there and produce these visions that they’re willing to sacrifice themselves. That sounds crazy today, because we don’t have the vaguest inkling of what sacrifice means in this culture.”

“Maybe you need the tragic. Maybe the tragic is indelible…and that’s what makes creation so beautiful.”

WWDT: “What Would Dostoyevsky Think?” (Ask yourself about the opinions of your revered artist heroes when you’re working on a piece…)

“The responsibility is on each individual person to use these tools in the best way possible in an environment that discourages it on every level.”

“Mainstream American culture since the end of the second World War has been predicated on the need to distract ourselves from The Bomb.”

“All in all it seems like the dirty secrets are coming out, and that can only be good.”

Analog vs. Digital Epistemologies…Reality is Analog/Reality is Digital

“I couldn’t believe that reality was analog if I didn’t believe it was also digital.”

More Episodes

12/13/2020

Ramin Nazer & The TeaFaerie: Mid-Singularity Trialogues, Part 1

Season 1, Ep. 158
This week I’m delighted to bring The Teafaerie (ep. 100) and Ramin Nazer (ep. 120) back to Future Fossils Podcast! These are two of the funniest, weirdest amateur futurists I know, and I hope you agree this discussion was worth the wait while I spent hours making it sound like we didn’t just talk over each other like overexcited dorks for two-plus-hours.In this episode, we discuss the virtualization of live events as relates to the science fiction of Charles Stross and Hannu Rajaniemi, the stratification of class according to who can afford to be somewhere in person, and my writing on AR and telepresence for H+ Magazine (“Best Seat In The House”) and the Body Hacking Conference Blog (“Being Every Drone”). We talk about the perverse incentives of social media as an outrage generator and surveillance capitalism pit trap, and how we might be able to redesign the social Web so it doesn’t drive us all (even more) insane. Plus:•The world being transformed into an unending series of limnoid events•Having “an affinity for the rapids”•Should we just side with our new AI overlords?•Beyond the Black Mirror•A very curious fan theory about the Flintstones & Jetsons•The Bell Riots in Star Trek DS9•Eternal upload simulation matrix reawakeningsAnd more, until we all get shut down by a robot in mid-sentence.If you aren’t sated after listening to their episodes (and who could be?), subscribe to Ramin’s Rainbow Brainskull Hour and The Teafaerie’s YouTube Channel.Please rate and review Future Fossils on Apple Podcasts! And if you believe in the value of this show and want to see it thrive, support Future Fossils on Patreon. Patrons gain access to over twenty secret episodes, unreleased music, our book club, and many other treats.And Happy Holidays: I just made all of the Future Fossils Book Club recordings free. You’re now welcome to enjoy at your leisure our small-group discussions on some of my favorite works of science fiction and psychedelic non-fiction: books by Peter Watts, Diana Reed Slattery, Cixin Liu, Octavia Butler, and Jeff VanderMeer…AND here’s a Spotify Playlist for psychedelic experiences created by Future Fossils listener Rian Bevans (host of The Riancarnation Podcast) that, along with legends like Brian Eno and Four Tet, heavily features instrumental music by yours truly (some of which also made it on the official clinical playlist for FDA’s MDMA for PTSD trials).We’d also love to have you in our thriving little Discord server, if you’re interested in meeting other members of our awesome scene. (And if you’re up for helping edit Future Fossils Podcast transcripts, please drop me a line at futurefossilspodcast@gmail.com.)Intro and outro music is from Skytree’s new LP of spacey downtempo electronica, Infraplanetary, which I highly encourage you to purchase. Official podcast theme is “God Detector” by Skytree (featuring Michael Garfield).Enjoy, and thanks for listening!
11/20/2020

Phil Ford on Taboo: Time and Belief in Exotica

Ep. 157
This week I’m honored to speak with musicologist Phil Ford, co-host of Weird Studies, on a voyage that takes us from elevator muzak to aquarian cults to Disneyland to the future of magical warfare. We discuss what it means to be (or want to be) “primitives of an unknown culture,” the staging of nature, what happens when your aesthetic commitments become your reality commitments, ontological anarchy, and The Super Mario Bros Movie’s influence on the 2016 presidential election. Keep your ears peeled for deep cuts on Fight Club, the Alt-Right, Les Baxter, William Irwin Thompson, Jurassic Park, and Burning Man…Read Phil’s essay, “Taboo: Time and Belief in Exotica.” And while you’re at it, read my comments on his essay about Time Binding & Music History on The Long Now Blog.Please rate and review Future Fossils on Apple Podcasts! And if you believe in the value of this show and want to see it thrive, support Future Fossils on Patreon. Patrons gain access to over twenty secret episodes, unreleased music, our book club, and many other great things as they spill out of my overactive imagination.We’d also love to have you in our thriving little Discord server, if you’re interested in meeting other members of our awesome scene. (And if you’re up for helping edit Future Fossils Podcast transcripts, please drop me a line at futurefossilspodcast@gmail.com.)Even though we didn’t watch them until later, there must be time loops flowing back into this conversation from both the documentary Feels Good Man and the satire Sassy Justice. Go watch them both immediately and you’ll know what I mean.For more, check out my appearance on Weird Studies 26 and Phil’s appearance on Future Fossils 126. And then read more about why things keep turning into crabs at Boing Boing and in the Future Fossils Facebook Group (1, 2).Intro and outro music is from Skytree’s new LP of spacey downtempo electronica, Infraplanetary.Cover art sourced from the uncannily appropriate less-real.com/images/21162.Enjoy, and thanks for listening!
11/6/2020

Stuart Davis on Zen, Aliens, and Psychedelics

Ep. 156
“There’s a Mormon Tabernacle Choir inside of everyone. It’s just better to include and embrace all these facets of identity.”I’m not going to waste your time trying to explain Stuart Davis. He’s been a guiding star for me and presumably many other irrepressibly nondisciplinary artists for over a decade, one of the founding figures of my adult psyche in its pluriform contortionism. Musician, painter, poet, talk show host, stand-up comic, film-maker, and depth psychologist, the man knows no bounds and it’s all I can do to follow closely and listen carefully, which I have since I first encountered his work in 2004.Stuart is long overdue to be on the show, but the timing is perfect, because we’re here to talk about ALIENS. Not the admittedly excellent film, but the living reality of them and their astonishingly intimate relationship to us, as disclosed by the growing archive of guests on his show, Aliens and Artists.We discuss the ethics of withholding advanced technologies like zero-point energy from the general public; Rick Strassman getting kicked out of his zendo for psychedelic research; circadian rhythms, sleep disruption for dream yoga, and parenting sleep deprivation psychosis; when Psyche argues with the Mantis; the self is a choir; daily banishings and welcomings; and why we implore you to only work with the visitors that respect human sovereignty.I’ll stop now. Just listen and be amazed.Links:Stuart’s WebsiteStuart's Podcast"Fear of Light" (song)"Universe Communion" (song)“ET Presence & The Forfeiture of Human Sovereignty” (blog)“Becoming Human” (comedic short)Please rate and review Future Fossils on Apple Podcasts! And if you believe in the value of this show and want to see it thrive, support Future Fossils on Patreon. Patrons gain access to over twenty secret episodes, unreleased music, our book club, and many other great things as they spill out of my overactive imagination.We’d also love to have you in our thriving little Discord server, if you’re interested in meeting other members of our awesome scene. (And if you’re up for helping edit Future Fossils Podcast transcripts, please drop me a line at futurefossilspodcast@gmail.com.)Intro and outro music is from Skytree’s new LP of spacey downtempo electronica, Infraplanetary, which I highly encourage you to purchase.Enjoy, and thanks for listening!

Comments