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Explaining History

Discussing Che Guevara


In this episode of the Explaining History podcast, we dive deep into the complex legacy of Che Guevara, the iconic revolutionary figure whose image has transcended generations. Our special guest, acclaimed author Otto English, joins us to discuss his new book, "Fake Heroes," which critically examines the myths and realities surrounding Che Guevara.


English, known for his incisive analysis and engaging storytelling, sheds light on the lesser-known aspects of Guevara's life and the consequences of his actions. The episode navigates through Guevara's journey from a young idealist to a key figure in the Cuban Revolution, questioning the romanticized portrayal that often overshadows the more contentious aspects of his legacy.


Listeners will be treated to a nuanced conversation that delves into how Guevara's image has been commodified and romanticized over the years, often at the expense of historical accuracy. English brings a fresh perspective, challenging the traditional narratives and exploring the dichotomy between Guevara's ideals and the methods he employed to achieve them.


This episode is a must-listen for history enthusiasts and anyone interested in understanding the complexities of revolutionary icons. Join us as we unpack the myths, explore the controversies, and gain a deeper understanding of Che Guevara through the critical lens of Otto English's research and insights.

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