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Run part two: How political is China’s “run” phenomenon?

Fed up with a system they feel has let them down, blue-collar Chinese workers are moving to Japan. And they have bleak views about the society they’ve left behind.  


In the second episode of our series on why Chinese people are leaving their country, Alice Su, The Economist’s senior China correspondent and David Rennie, our Beijing bureau chief, ask: how political is the “run” phenomenon?


Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcasts.


Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+


For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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