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cover art for Drum Tower: Islands in the Strait

Drum Tower

Drum Tower: Islands in the Strait

Kinmen is caught in the middle. The tiny island is 187km from Taiwan, which administers it, but only 3km away from China, which does not. If a conflict were to break out between China and America, Taiwan would be the front line. And if a confrontation began between China and Taiwan, Kinmen would play that role. 


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, hear from Kinmenese locals about their history, their identity and their future. 


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