Cup of TEA

  • 4. Brian Houston

    27:33
    This week Catherine and Mike meet Brian Houston, Knowledge Exchange lecturer based in the Aura Innovation Centre, discussing his academic journey through research, teaching and knowledge exchange (KE).Brian is a Mechanical Engineering Knowledge Exchange Lecturer, and Manager of the Aura InventX initiative. As a KE advocate he is passionate about facilitating collaboration through the delivery of multi-disciplinary Research, Development, and Innovation projects; and bringing together the Aura Innovation Centre (AIC) facility and team, academic and technical colleagues from across the University, and external stakeholders over real world innovation challenges. He aims to increase utilisation of, and accessibility to, University Research and Development capabilities; and to combine them with academic expertise to support Knowledge Exchange initiatives, increase research impact, and to encourage progressive education.“The ethos of Knowledge Exchange is integral to both research and education […] whenever I was standing in a lecture theatre projecting to a group of students, you could generally always be confident you were the most knowledgeable in that subject in that room at that particular time. In the Knowledge Exchange domain, I find myself standing in front of public audiences and you just look into the audience, and you could have someone there with 40 years in the industry, an expert in that particular area. At the same time, he is probably there to understand what I know about the subject at that time because he is open minded to be engaging in that way. So I tend to, as a result, go into a conversation humble, expecting to understand the person you are speaking to, before you are expected to be understood... and I think that works for the other domains as well. You need to know what level of understanding of your subject students have.“ You can contact Brian on LinkedIn.InventX brochure Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share it with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 3. Clare Whitfield

    19:37
    In this podcast, Catherine and Mike meet Clare Whitfield, Lecturer in Advanced Practice in Faculty of Health Sciences.Clare's focus is on teaching healthcare students and registered practitioners research methods and the use of research to inform evidence-based practice. Clare has over 20 years’ experience teaching research and research methods, across a range of academic disciplines, including Social Sciences and Education. She works with a wide range of student, including undergraduates, postgraduate taught and postgraduate research candidates. Clare is enthusiastic about using innovative approaches to teaching and learning and has recently achieved senior fellow of AdvanceHE. Clare is an active qualitative researcher, with an interest in teenage sexual health and pregnancy, women’s health and distance care and enjoys using her experiences as a researcher to inform her teaching practice.“i thought if I could get the students to really think about the assignment, they would start to make some connections about what we learn across the module... [an extra] way of going through an assignment…  not just ‘that’s what you are expected to do"... it’s a really important moment when students make it their own assignment… and using pictures to make things just every day where people feel they can be comfortable with the idea.” Assignment burgerThank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share it with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 2. Dom Henri

    37:04
    In this episode, Mike and Catherine meet with Dominic Henri, who splits his time between the University of Hull’s School of Natural Sciences and the Teaching Excellence Academy. Dom is a Senior Lecturer in Zoology whose disciplinary specialism is conservation and ecology, but whose primary focus is Higher Education pedagogy (particularly the interface between assessment, student development, and employability).In the podcast, we discuss the journey behind a published study evidencing one way of raising the visibility of diversity in STEM Higher Education. The journey starts with a conundrum of how to increase perceptions of diversity within the discipline when little of that diversity is represented directly within the teaching team. By the end, we consider how engaging with diversity is not just important for students, but can completely revitalise our own understanding of the subject and the narrative that our students take from our teaching.“What you conclude on a subject holds weight... If you say that something is good or bad or well-evidenced or not, some students are going to remember that... So how can I provide as balanced a perspective on this as possible?” If anyone would like to be part of the future of this project, please contact Dom directly via email.Study reference:Henri, D.C., Coates, K. and Hubbard, K., 2023. I am a scientist: Overcoming biased assumptions around diversity in science through explicit representation of scientists in lectures. Plos one, 18(7), p.e0271010.Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share it with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 1. Karen Hubbard

    33:40
    In this episode, Catherine and Mike meet Karen Hubbard, lecturer in Social Work in the School of Psychology and Social Work. Karen is the Programme Director for BA Social Work and Social Work lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion. She is a registered social worker with a passion for social justice, human rights and participation. Karen has practiced nationally and internationally in these fields with particular interests in platforming the voices of poorly served communities. Her previous work has included rights-based practice, participatory appraisal, peer-led research and policy work.Within a teaching and learning context Karen’s commitment to decolonising educational practices through critically reflective learning platforms invites us to challenge and unsettle traditional conceptions of knowledge production by deconstructing traditional hierarchies of knowledge and honouring indigenous knowledge and this podcast is all about this commitment and the 100 ways of knowing project.If you are interested in this field of teaching and learning, please do get in touch and if you would like to find out more about it, Karen kindly provided a non-exhaustive list of further reading & resources.Bhambra, G.K. (2018) ‘Decolonising the University’; London Pluto PressBhopal, K. (2018) White privilege: The myth of a post-racial society. Bristol: Policy Press.DiAngelo, R. (2018) ‘White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism’Freire, P. (2000) ‘Pedagogy of the oppressed’ London: Bloomsbury PublishingGivens, T.E. (2021) ‘Radical Empathy: Finding a Path to Bridging Racial Divides’. Bristol: Policy Press.Harms Smith, L. & Rasool, S. (2020) ‘Deep Transformation toward Decoloniality in Social Work: Themes for Change in a Social Work Higher Education Program’. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 31(2), 144-164.Hooks, Bell. (1994). ‘Teaching to transgress : education as the practice of freedom’. New York: RoutledgeLentin, A. (2020) Why Race Still Matters. Bristol: Policy Press.McGregor, R. and Sang-ah Park, M. (2019) ‘Towards a deconstructed curriculum: Rethinking higher education in the Global North’ Teaching in Higher Education, 24(3): 332-345Mullen, J. (2023) ‘Decolonizing Therapy: Oppression, Historical Trauma, and Politicizing Your Practice’ New York, WW Norton & CoSchucan Bird, K. and Pitman, L. (2019) ‘How diverse is your reading list? Exploring issues of representation and decolonisation in the UK’ Higher Education, 79, 903–920Smith, L.T. (2022) ‘Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples’ London, Bloomsbury Academic Twikirize, J.M. and Tusasiirwe, S. (2023) ‘ Ubuntu Philosophy and Decolonising Social Work Fields of Practice in Africa (Indigenous and Environmental Social Work)’ Oxfordshire, RouteledgeTuck, E. and Yang, K.W. (2012) ‘Decolonization is not a metaphor’; Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society Vol. 1, No. 1, 2012, pp. 1-40Zembylas, M., (2018). Reinventing critical pedagogy as decolonizing pedagogy: The education of empathy. Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 40(5), pp.404–421Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 8. Michelle Kennedy

    20:08
    In this episode, we're joined by Michelle Kennedy, from the School of Nursing & Midwifery, who speaks about the Student/Staff Partnership project she and a colleague recently supported with four enthusiastic student partners and what they all learnt from the experience.“We were very keen to work with the students for support but to let them lead and take the direction they wanted to lead...”Partners involved in the project:Demi Bell, Emma Marston, Shanna Gray & Izzie Pearson, Adult Nursing students & apprentices;Michelle Kennedy & Paula Gawthorpe, Senior Lecturers in Nursing & Midwifery.RoutesIntoNursing_Poster.pdfThank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 7. Holly Smith

    30:14
    Tune in this week as we meet with Holly Smith from the School of Education, reflecting on her use of Lego in her teaching, including sharing tips for those interested in using it.“We can all build!... being given a focus for our build […] you’re naturally starting to engage which something that could be a completely subconscious idea […] and putting Lego in front of you and having that form allows you to really get carried away and enjoy play!”Holly mentioned in the podcast, a new course being designed. BA (Hons) Secondary Teaching Studies is now offered in English, Geography, History, Mathematics, Computer Science and Physics.More information.Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share it with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 6. Claire Carr

    53:30
    In this episode, Mike and Catherine meet with Claire Carr, from the University of Hull Business School, who discusses with passion her approach to teaching, covering areas such as co-creation with students, playfulness in teaching, ways to support digital literacy and inclusivity in the classroom.Claire is Lecturer in Marketing, Management, and Business Strategy and specialises in learning and development within the subject group of Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management. Claire recently led an aspirations and expectations survey for all incoming business studies students and have received 160 responses. Claire plans to revisit these responses throughout their academic journey. Additionally, she is now leading a project in the Faculty of Business, Law & Politics that focuses on embedding inclusive teaching in the classroom. This is set to be a two-year project. Claire is open to inquiries about both projects and can be reached via email. Claire has also just submitted her application for senior fellow of AdvanceHE and waiting to hear! “I want students to be able to have moments of euphoria and moments of panic because I think this is creating an environment where they are learning about themselves, their disciplines…”Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 5. James Pritchett

    28:51
    In this episode, James Pritchett, from the School of Politics and International Studies, talks all things gamification and simulations, how he uses those within group work and links to authentic assessment.“an engaging activity… helps build skills like cooperation, teamwork, leadership…”Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you enjoy it.Please do subscribe and share with anyone you think might enjoy.Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
  • 4. Aruni Samarakoon and Lanre Lawal

    01:02:39
    We're joined this week by Aruni Samarakoon, from the School of Politics & International Studies, and Lanre Lawal from the School of Nursing, two postgraduate researchers who share their experiences of teaching, while studying for their postgraduate degree. Lanre: "When I see how well my students have done, it makes me very happy!"Aruni: “In this module there were mostly male students and two female students who were going to withdraw... I was able to convince them to carry on as I brought my feminist knowledge to the field!”Thank you for taking time to listen to the podcast. We hope you've enjoyed it!Remember to subscribe and share!Cup of TEA artwork created by Layla Jabbari
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