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CITO Conversations

Policy and European Economic Convergence

Season 1, Ep. 6

In this seminar, Professors Frank Barry and Marcin Piątkowski contrast Ireland and Poland’s pathways to economic independence and growth, through the lens of industrial and economic policy. This, against the turbulence of world events straddling the 20th and 21st centuries. We look at the growth of these two European nations ex-post being constituent states of colonial empires.


The seminar was chaired by Dorota Piaskowska, associate professor in strategy and international business at University College Dublin, Ireland.


Frank Barry is Professor of International Business & Economic Development at Trinity Business School and a member of the Royal Irish Academy.


And Marcin Piątkowski is Professor of Economics at Kozminski University, Warsaw, and Lead Economist at the World Bank.


This talk was recorded in person with a live audience on April 8th, 2024, in the UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School, Dublin, Ireland.


The seminar was supported by the Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Dublin and the UCD College of Business.


Location - Lecture Theatre N204 (followed by a reception in the Laurence Crowley Boardroom)

UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School

Carysfort Avenue, Blackrock, County Dublin

 

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The musical elements used are from the ‘Adagio in G Minor’ released under a CC-BY 3.0 license.

See the show-notes or the description for details.


Acknowledgements


Music 

Title: Adagio in G minor

Artist: Remo Giazotto attributed to Tomaso Albinoni

Source: https://soundcloud.com/dick-de-ridder/adagio-in-g-minor-albinoni

Licensed by Dick de Ridder: CC-BY 3.0


Cover Art 

Title: GraphicsAndText

Artist: Allen Higgins

Source: Collage/various (CITO-podcast-FrankMarcin.pptx)

License: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0


Podcast License

Design Talk (dot IE) CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 

The license can be viewed at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

By taking part you give permission for your voice to be recorded, for the recording to be edited, and for it to be posted and published as a podcast.

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