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China's reset

Last year, we talked about China needing to find a mechanism to fix its economy. It looks like it may have found it - by abruptly ending its zero-Covid policies. The FT’s Shanghai correspondent Tom Hale and Global China Editor James Kynge break down what President Xi Jinping’s main goals are and whether it’s enough to jumpstart the country’s economy.


Clips from CNN, BBC

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BTM listeners, we want to know what you think of the show and what you want to hear more of. Visit ft.com/btmsurvey to submit your feedback. 

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For further reading:

Xi Jinping’s plan to reset China’s economy and win back friends

China’s economy begins to reopen after 3 years of Covid isolation 

China’s Covid generation: the surging inequality behind Xi’s U-turn

I spent 10 days in a secret Chinese Covid detention centre

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On Twitter, follow Tom Hale (@TomHale_), James Kynge (@JKynge) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07)


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

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