Share

cover art for Can WeightWatchers survive the Wegovy era?

Behind the Money

Can WeightWatchers survive the Wegovy era?

WeightWatchers is struggling. Launched in the early 1960s, the brand grew by helping members shed pounds through behavioural change programmes. Then, GLP-1 anti-obesity drugs hit the market, long-time spokesperson and board member Oprah Winfrey announced her departure, and the company’s credit rating was downgraded. FT reporter Anna Mutoh examines whether WeightWatchers’ latest strategy can produce the turnaround investors are hoping for.  


Clip from Lionsgate Television

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

For further reading:

WeightWatchers faces an era when weight loss comes in a syringe

Behold the Ozempic effect on business 

The race to develop the next generation of weight-loss drugs

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

On X, follow Anna Mutoh (@anna_mutoh) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more. 


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com

More episodes

View all episodes

  • Best Of: Inside a hedge fund disaster

    21:56
    This week, we’re revisiting an episode from last November, about a Wall Street saga that lost shareholders more than $10bn. In 2007, when Dan Och took his hedge fund public, he was making a bet that his company would stand the test of time. More than 15 years, a bribery scandal, and a feud with his protégé later, the FT’s Ortenca Aliaj and Sujeet Indap explain how things did not work out as planned. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:Sculptor Capital: grey areas cause grey hairs in messy bidding warFight over Sculptor hedge fund sale entwined in Daniel Och’s tax affairsSale of Sculptor Capital on cusp of approval after hedge fund brawl- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Ortenca Aliaj (@OrtencaAl), Sujeet Indap (@sindap) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more. Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • Why auditors are missing red flags

    17:55
    Episode description: Audit firms are supposed to put a company’s books under the microscope. But these days, regulators are finding an increasing number of flaws in the audits that they inspect. The FT’s US accounting editor Stephen Foley explains what’s going wrong, and how regulators around the world plan to fix these shortcomings. Clips from CNN, NBC News - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:Why don’t auditors find fraud?Auditors failed to raise alarm before 75% of UK corporate collapsesBig Four firms rethink governance after year of mis-steps and scandals - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Stephen Foley (@stephenfoley) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • Introducing Untold: Power for Sale

    02:24
    Introducing Power for Sale, a new season of Untold from the Financial Times. In Untold: Power for Sale, host Valentina Pop and a team of FT correspondents from all over Europe investigate what happened in the Qatargate scandal, where EU lawmakers were accused of accepting payments from Qatar to whitewash its image.Subscribe and listen on: Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.
  • Dispatch from Omaha: Berkshire after Warren Buffett

    23:03
    Late last year, Warren Buffett’s close business confidant Charlie Munger died at 99. Munger’s death and Buffett’s upcoming 94th birthday have renewed questions about the future of Berkshire Hathaway. What will the empire he’s built look like after he’s no longer at the helm? Behind the Money and the FT’s senior corporate finance correspondent Eric Platt travel to Omaha, Nebraska for Berkshire Hathaway’s annual shareholder meeting, to get a better sense of how the next generation will lead America’s “last great” conglomerate.  Clips from CNBC- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:Berkshire after Buffett: is Greg Abel up to the top job?Berkshire after Buffett: prized energy business faces upheavalBerkshire after Buffett: the risk ‘genius’ pulling the insurance stringsBerkshire after Buffett: can any stockpicker follow the Oracle?- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Eric Platt (@ericgplatt) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • Coming soon: China, the new tech superpower

    01:07
    In a new season of Tech Tonic, longtime FT China reporter Jame Kynge travels around the world to see how China is pushing towards tech supremacy. Will China be able to get an edge in crucial technological areas? What does China’s attempt to leapfrog the west look like on the ground? A 6-part series looking at China’s tech industry.Presented by James Kynge. Edwin Lane is the senior producer. The producer is Josh Gabert-Doyon. Executive producer is Manuela Saragosa. Sound design by Breen Turner and Samantha Giovinco, with original music from Metaphor Music. The FT’s head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.
  • Was the Archegos implosion illegal?

    23:38
    Three years ago, chaos struck Wall Street. Companies saw their share prices tumble, seemingly out of nowhere. Major banks lost billions of dollars in the fallout. Eventually, that chaos was linked to a family office, Archegos Capital Management, and its founder Bill Hwang. This week, Hwang heads to trial in New York, where he faces charges including racketeering, and securities and wire fraud. The FT’s US legal correspondent Joe Miller examines the “novel” case prosecutors plan to pursue. Clips from CNBC, Fox Business- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:‘To what end?’: the murky question of Bill Hwang’s motive in Archegos trialArchegos founder’s charity was financial ‘escape pod’, suit allegesHedge funds and brokers take aim at post-Archegos trading reforms- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Joe Miller (@JoeMillerJr) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • How shale rewrote the global oil order

    17:41
    For decades, countries in the Middle East have dominated the oil market, pumping large quantities of the world’s supply. Along with that has come a pattern: when there’s conflict in the region, oil prices rise. The pattern seems to be breaking though, mainly because of one thing: US shale. The FT’s Myles McCormick explains how production in the country shifted oil’s epicentre away from the Middle East, and how long that may last. Clips from Al Jazeera, CBS, CNN- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:How US shale keeps sheltering America from the next oil price surgeOn markets and geopolitics, it is a mistake to forget about shaleWhy oil prices remain steady even as Middle East tensions escalate- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Myles McCormick (@mylesmccormick_) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more. Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • When M&A goes wrong

    20:39
    When a company is sold there tends to be a standard playbook: There’s some tough negotiations. Then, the buyer gets a business and the seller gets a check. Everyone’s happy. That’s not what happened when a private equity firm recently bought a California grocery store chain. The FT’s Wall Street editor Sujeet Indap explains how the deal went off the rails, and how the supermarket’s owners might end up paying millions of dollars to sell their company. Clip from KCRA - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:The inequity method of accountingOpposition shadows Cerberus windfall from Albertsons supermarket deal The pool is closed, part 1- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Sujeet Indap (@sindap) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com
  • Inside the battle for America’s West

    23:33
    A few years ago, four men went on a hunting trip to Wyoming. That trip would end up changing their lives — and possibly, the future of the public’s access to millions of acres of land in America's western states. The FT’s Oliver Roeder expands on the saga that’s played out since 2021 inside courtrooms and within thousands of pages of legal documents.  Clips from KGWN, Ludlow Music and The Richmond Organisation- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - For further reading:Battle for the American WestSeven states, 3,000 miles: a trip across the US energy divideWyoming’s Carbon Valley aims to turn ‘coal into gold’- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - On X, follow Oliver Roeder (@ollie) and Michela Tindera (@mtindera07), or follow Michela on LinkedIn for updates about the show and more.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com