Share

BBC Earth Podcast

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet. Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishin...

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science andthehuman experience in a podcast the size of the planet.Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the
4/6/2021

Saving the world's rarest marine mammal

Season 4, Ep. 11
In this episode, we’re delving into the topic of extinction. We'll be finding out about some of the animals who are critically endangered, meeting the people trying to rescue them, and exploring species who may be able to make miraculous comebacks.Perhaps one of the most endangered species is the vaquita, a small sea mammal with a population of less than 20. We hear from some extraordinary people weathering threats and tragedies in an attempt to bring these ‘pandas of the ocean’ back from the brink.According to US Department of Agriculture researcher, Dr Samuel Ramsey, every discovery is built upon a discovery that came before it. Yet some of those discoveries can be found in the most unexpected of places. For Samuel, understanding his father’s health issues provided the key to discovering why honeybee populations are on the decrease.And to finish, we’re asking one of the biggest questions in paleontology: how did birds evolve from dinosaurs? To help us explore this topic, we’ve got the help of Jingmai O’Connor whose work in China has helped shed light on the distant link between the extinct dinosaur and ballooning bird populations.Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…Website:www.bbcearth.comFacebook:www.facebook.com/bbcearth/Instagram:www.instagram.com/bbcearth/Twitter:www.twitter.com/bbcearth
3/14/2021

The desert rocks that 'sing'

Season 4, Ep. 7
We’re exploring the boundary between our world and the world of myth, mysticism, and magic. We’ll discover how some of the customs and practices from our ancient ancestors continue to influence our relationship with the natural world today.To begin, we’re opening our ears to some of the sounds of the natural world and the inanimate objects that produce them. On a trip to Serengeti, Jahawi stumbled across rocks which, when hit by another type of rock, produced different sounds. He leads us into the world of the rocks that ‘sing’.The Baka are one of the oldest hunter gatherer societies in the world. They’re physically and spiritually connected to the forests they inhabit. This connection runs so deep that they believe their top hunters have the ability to experience the world from another animal’s point of view.And in South Africa she’s known as the ‘frog lady’, but Dr Jeanne Tarrant didn’t always love them. Like many others, she grew up scared of frogs. Now, however, she works tirelessly to protect them, which includes dispelling some surprising myths that continue to put the lives of these amphibians at risk.Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…Website:www.bbcearth.comFacebook:www.facebook.com/bbcearth/Instagram:www.instagram.com/bbcearth/Twitter:www.twitter.com/bbcearth