Addictions Edited: the monthly take-home

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Maike Klein on experiences of relapse

Season 1, Ep. 17

This podcast is for anyone who wants to understand the experience of and feelings associated with relapse.


Dr Maike Klein talks about her qualitative research into relapse, and about how different people conceptualise and perceive relapse. She talks about how, for some, it is a process rather than an event, whereas for others it is a shocking and immediate experience. There are also elements of self-actualisation and learning that can follow a relapse - as well as the real fear that relapse can cause.


Maike talks about the feelings of powerlessness that can accompany relapse as well as the importance that some people place on gaining trust in themselves. Looking further into the language of relapse, Maike explores how relapse is sometimes seen as a location by some people and the implications this has for working with substance use.


Maike also spoke to people who work in addiction treatment services about their experiences working with people who relapse and of second-hand trauma.


“How does it feel like for a therapist to witness their client’s relapse and does that impact the way that they approach their therapeutic work?”


“It feels almost like torture in their minds of having that internal fragmentation that’s almost more difficult than the relapse experience itself”. 


The opinions expressed in this podcast reflect the views of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the opinions or official positions of the SSA.

The SSA does not endorse or guarantee the accuracy of the information in external sources or links and accepts no responsibility or liability for any consequences arising from the use of such information.

More Episodes

12/8/2022

Autism and addiction - episode 1

Season 1, Ep. 15
In this two-part podcast, the SSA's Rob Calder explores autism and addiction. He talks to Professors Julia Sinclair and Sam Chamberlain, Dr Janine Robinson and Chris Torry from the SABAA: Substance use, Alcohol and Behavioural addictions in Autism project that’s been funded by the SSA.In this first episode, we look at how symptoms of behavioural and substance addictions can overlap with autism and how this can complicate diagnoses for both. We explore some of the causes of substance use that are particular to autism, whilst looking at how autistic people often use substances in ways that might make them more vulnerable to addiction. This includes issues of using alcohol to address social anxiety. We also ask why some treatment services can be difficult for autistic people to access and how treatment services might start to address these issues.“Maybe our diagnostic tools need to consider more carefully that fine line between when something maybe becomes a behavioural addiction versus something that perhaps is a core part of autism” - Dr Janine Robinson“What we have here is several spectrum disorders, people’s substance use might be on a spectrum, alcohol use might be on a spectrum and their manifestation of autism is also on a spectrum.” - Professor Julia Sinclair“Treatment structured around groupwork can be really difficult for some people because it’s overwhelming or stressful. The sensory environment can be really unpleasant lots of fluorescent lights and noise and lots of people interacting in sometimes intense and difficult to process ways.” - Chris Torry“One issue is that many clinicians may not be familiar with autism. Other clinicians, for example, who are familiar with autism may have no training in behavioural addictions or substance use disorders.” - Professor Sam ChamberlainProfessor Julia SinclairJulia Sinclair is Professor of Addiction Psychiatry in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton, and honorary consultant in alcohol liaison at University Hospital Southampton.Dr Janine RobinsonJanine Robinson is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist and a specialist in the field of autism in adults. She completed her DClinPsy at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, London in 2000.Professor Sam ChamberlainSam Chamberlain is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Southampton, and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust.Chris Torry Chris Torry is autistic and has worked in addiction treatment services for many years. He is part of the SABAA project.The opinions expressed in this post reflect the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the opinions or official positions of the SSA or the author’s academic institution. The SSA does not endorse or guarantee the accuracy of the information in external sources or links and accepts no responsibility or liability for any consequences arising from the use of such information.