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Cannabis use and the brain with Janna Cousijn

Ep. 22

Suzi Gage talks to Janna Cousijn about her paper on the long term consequences of cannabis use for the brain, written for the series Clinical issues: substance use disorders and the body


Kroon E, Kuhns L, Hoch E, Cousijn J. Heavy cannabis use, dependence and the brain: a clinical perspective. Addiction 2020; 115: 559-572

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.14776


You can access all articles published in the Clinical issues series so far in the virtual issue

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/toc/10.1111/(ISSN)1360-0443.clinical_issues_substance_use_disorders_and_the_body_virtual_issue

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9/29/2022

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