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Neighborly help for the poor; Americans flunk political science

Ep. 169

On this week’s Acton Line podcast we hear about a church-based ministry that engages with the homeless and poor “relationally, responsibly, and compassionately.” James Whitford, executive director of Watered Gardens Gospel Rescue Mission in Joplin, Missouri, joins Acton’s Andrew Vanderput in a thought provoking conversation on private charity and the intensely personal nature of the organization’s outreach. In the second segment, Aquinas College economist David Hebert and Acton’s Tyler Groenendal dig into the public’s deep dissatisfaction with America’s political institutions – and Americans’ deep ignorance of how these same organizations work. A 2017 study showed, for example, that more than a third of those surveyed (37 percent) can’t name any of the rights guaranteed under the First Amendment.

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8/5/2020

Critiquing the 1619 Project with Phil Magness

Ep. 240
Since debuting in the New York Times Magazine on August 14, 2019, the 1619 Project has ignited a debate about American history, the founding of the country and the legacy emanating from the nation’s history with chattel slavery.The project’s creator and editor, Nikole Hannah-Jones, has described the project as seeking to place “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.” Components of a related school curriculum have been adopted in major cities like Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Buffalo, New York. For her work on the project, Hannah-Jones was awarded the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.But the project has also come in for heavy criticism from historians and economists of all political and philosophical persuasions for inaccuracies in "matters of verifiable fact” in history and economics. In response to these critics, Hannah-Jones just recently declared the project not a work history, but instead a work of journalism.One of the project’s most frequent critics is Phil Magness, Senior Research Fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research.On this episode, Phil Magness discusses the objectives of the 1619 project, the economic history of slavery, the project’s historical errors and why many Americans seem to have such a difficult time accepting the complicated totality of our own history.Phillip W. Magness at the American Institute for Economic ResearchThe 1619 Project - The New York Times MagazineThe 1619 Project: A Critique - Phil MagnessPublic Schools Are Teaching The 1619 Project in Class, Despite Concerns From Historians - ReasonKarl Marx: Intellectual father of the 1619 Project? - Rev. Ben JohnsonThe 1619 Projection: 3 lies Pulitzer should not reward - Rev. Ben Johnson