Acton Line

1/13/2021

Anne Bradley & Iain Murray on socialism and poverty

Ep. 263
In this episode, we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty.These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty.Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Scot Bertram talks with Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, and Iain Murray, vice president for strategy and senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute and author of the recent book, “The Socialist Temptation.” They discuss the reasons why socialism is not an effective method for reducing poverty and helping the poor regain their dignity.Highlighting the inconsistencies in thought that prevent it from ever working in practice, the panel addresses why socialism seems to be an attractive option to some young Americans and how economic freedom can point the way toward a more prosperous country for all.Anne Rathbone Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesIain Murray - Competitive Enterprise InstituteScot Bertram - Hillsdale CollegeThe Socialist Temptation - Iain MurrayAnne Rathbone Bradley on eliminating poverty through economic freedom - Acton LineAnne Rathbone Bradley on why Christians must support economic freedom - Acton Lecture SeriesThe socialist temptation with Iain Murray - Acton LinePoverty Cure SummitSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast
12/16/2020

Philippa Stroud & Anne Bradley on pandemic and poverty

Ep. 259
This week we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty.These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty.Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Al Kresta talks with Baroness Philippa Stroud, CEO of the Legatum Institute, and Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, about poverty and the COVID-19 pandemic.For decades, the number of individuals living in extreme poverty across the globe has fallen. Yet last month, the World Bank reported that COVID-19 could add approximately 100 million people to the ranks of those in extreme poverty by the end of 2020. The panelists examine how the pandemic has impacted poverty reduction efforts and how the marketplace has responded to the pandemic.Baroness Philippa Stroud - Legatum InstituteAnne Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesPoverty Cure Summit - Access now on-demand for only $19How to rebuild the economy after COVID-19 - Richard TurnbullA free-market agenda for rebuilding from the coronavirus - Henrik RasmussenSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast
12/2/2020

Jordan Ballor on Abraham Kuyper's "Common Grace"

Ep. 257
Common Grace is both a theological doctrine within the reformed tradition and the title of a truly monumental book discussing the doctrine by the theologian and statesmen Abraham Kuyper.It is grace from God that is common to all of mankind distinct from both the special grace by which God redeems, sanctifies, and glorifies his people as well as the gift of creation itself.Kuyper puts it this way, “Common grace issues from God, and from God come all the means that we humans must apply to oppose sin and its consequences in curse and misery.”But it is God himself who leads us to find the means and instructs us how to use them. And it is precisely the latter that is forgotten.The human inventor of the electric light and electric motor is extolled, but God, who led Edison to discover it, is passed over.Today, Acton’s Dan Hugger talks with Jordan Ballor, senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute and General Editor of the twelve volumeAbraham Kuyper: Collected Works in Public Theology, about Kuyper’s exploration of the doctrine in his monumental workCommon Grace.The third and final volume of this work, jointly published by Lexham Press and the Acton Institute, has recently been published in English translation.Jordan J. Ballor, PhD at Acton InstituteCommon Grace: God's Gifts for a Fallen World, Volume 3The Abraham Kuyper CollectionSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast
11/18/2020

Joel Sercel on the ethics of space exploration

Ep. 255
In 1958, in the wake of the Soviet Union launching Sputnik 1 – the world’s first artificial satellite – into space, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act into law.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or NASA, was born.And the space race was underway.In the following decades, the world would see the first man in space, the first spacewalk, and astronauts landing on the surface of the moon. Across eight different programs, the United States would fly 239 space missions, with 135 of those representing the space shuttle program.On August 31, 2011, the United States’ shuttle program was officially ended, and the United States government was out of the business of space exploration and travel.Today, private companies like Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin are leading the way into the final frontier.Elon Musk has announced his plan is to have 1 million people living in a colony on Mars by the year 2050.As a new space race to settle on Mars and, perhaps, beyond takes flight, significant ethical questions remain unclear and unanswered.Today, we talk with Joel Sercel, an entrepreneur and space technologist, who argues that we need to start building international consensus on questions surrounding bioethics, property rights, laws governing space travel and space settlements, and stewardship of God’s creation outside of the Earth’s atmosphere.Subscribe to Acton Institute Events podcastTransAstra CorpWould Kuyper go to Mars? - Dylan PahmanThe frontier spirit of ‘The Martian’ - Dylan PahmanThe stewardship of space - Jordan BallorThe new space capitalists - Jordan BallorThe cultural mandate and the final frontier - Dylan Pahman