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Acton Line

The official podcast of the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty.

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics.
Latest Episode1/27/2021

Matthew Kaemingk & Cory Willson on work and worship

Ep. 265
The question of how to reconcile our faith and our work is a permanent challenge after the fall into sin.In the Hebrew scriptures we read that God judges Adam: “Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life.”Recent years have seen a reinvigorated discussion, and even a broad movement, focused on the intersection of faith and work in the modern world.What does our worship have to do with our work? And what might our work have to do with our worship?Today, Acton senior research fellow Jordan Ballor talks with the coauthors of a new book focused on these questions. Matthew Kaemingk is assistant professor of Christian ethics at Fuller Theological Seminary and Cory Willson is Jake and Betsy Tuls Associate Professor of Missiology and Missional Ministry at Calvin Theological Seminary, and together they are the authors ofWork and Worship: Reconnecting Our Labor and Liturgy.Matthew Kaemingk - Fuller Theological SeminaryCory Willson - Calvin Theological SeminaryWork and Worship - Matthew Kaemingk & Cory WillsonGet Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) - Jordan BallorWork: The Meaning of Your Life - Lester DeKosterFaithful in All God's House - Gerard BerghoefMatthew Kaemingk and Cory B. Willson on Work and Worship - Calvin Institute of Christian WorshipWisdom and Work: Perspectives on Human Labor from Ecclesiastes - J. Daryl Charles
1/27/2021

Matthew Kaemingk & Cory Willson on work and worship

Ep. 265
The question of how to reconcile our faith and our work is a permanent challenge after the fall into sin.In the Hebrew scriptures we read that God judges Adam: “Cursed is the ground because of you; through painful toil you will eat food from it all the days of your life.”Recent years have seen a reinvigorated discussion, and even a broad movement, focused on the intersection of faith and work in the modern world.What does our worship have to do with our work? And what might our work have to do with our worship?Today, Acton senior research fellow Jordan Ballor talks with the coauthors of a new book focused on these questions. Matthew Kaemingk is assistant professor of Christian ethics at Fuller Theological Seminary and Cory Willson is Jake and Betsy Tuls Associate Professor of Missiology and Missional Ministry at Calvin Theological Seminary, and together they are the authors ofWork and Worship: Reconnecting Our Labor and Liturgy.Matthew Kaemingk - Fuller Theological SeminaryCory Willson - Calvin Theological SeminaryWork and Worship - Matthew Kaemingk & Cory WillsonGet Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) - Jordan BallorWork: The Meaning of Your Life - Lester DeKosterFaithful in All God's House - Gerard BerghoefMatthew Kaemingk and Cory B. Willson on Work and Worship - Calvin Institute of Christian WorshipWisdom and Work: Perspectives on Human Labor from Ecclesiastes - J. Daryl Charles
1/20/2021

Yuval Levin on the Capitol riot and institutional crisis

Ep. 264
Over the past several years, American institutions have faced challenges that have placed an enormous amount of stress and strain on them. Some of those challenges have been emergent phenomenon, while other challenges have been intentionally inflicted by political actors.In addition to the institutions themselves faltering for their own internal reasons, and in some senses being fed by that faltering, the American people have lost confidence in the legitimacy of government, business, media, and more.The downstream effects of this institutional crisis and loss of confidence have been higher than usual embraces of conspiracy theories and other forms of unreality. The January 6th riot at the United States Capitol was a striking and vivid example of the consequences of these problems.In this episode, Yuval Levin, director of social, cultural, and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute and the editor ofNational Affairs, explains these institutional crises, the failures of political leadership in this populist age, the growing embrace of forms of unreality, and what can be done about it.Yuval Levin - American Enterprise InstituteNational AffairsFailures of Leadership in a Populist Age - Yuval Levin (National Review)Trump's rebellion against reality - Yuval Levin (The Dispatch)The four cultural crises revealed by the D.C. riots - Rev. Ben Johnson (Acton Institute)Yuval Levin on why trust in institutions is declining - Acton LineYuval Levin on the search for solidarity in the age of Trump - Acton Lecture SeriesSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast
1/13/2021

Anne Bradley & Iain Murray on socialism and poverty

Ep. 263
In this episode, we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty.These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty.Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Scot Bertram talks with Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, and Iain Murray, vice president for strategy and senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute and author of the recent book, “The Socialist Temptation.” They discuss the reasons why socialism is not an effective method for reducing poverty and helping the poor regain their dignity.Highlighting the inconsistencies in thought that prevent it from ever working in practice, the panel addresses why socialism seems to be an attractive option to some young Americans and how economic freedom can point the way toward a more prosperous country for all.Anne Rathbone Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesIain Murray - Competitive Enterprise InstituteScot Bertram - Hillsdale CollegeThe Socialist Temptation - Iain MurrayAnne Rathbone Bradley on eliminating poverty through economic freedom - Acton LineAnne Rathbone Bradley on why Christians must support economic freedom - Acton Lecture SeriesThe socialist temptation with Iain Murray - Acton LinePoverty Cure SummitSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast
12/16/2020

Philippa Stroud & Anne Bradley on pandemic and poverty

Ep. 259
This week we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty.These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty.Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.In this conversation, moderator Al Kresta talks with Baroness Philippa Stroud, CEO of the Legatum Institute, and Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, about poverty and the COVID-19 pandemic.For decades, the number of individuals living in extreme poverty across the globe has fallen. Yet last month, the World Bank reported that COVID-19 could add approximately 100 million people to the ranks of those in extreme poverty by the end of 2020. The panelists examine how the pandemic has impacted poverty reduction efforts and how the marketplace has responded to the pandemic.Baroness Philippa Stroud - Legatum InstituteAnne Bradley - The Fund for American StudiesPoverty Cure Summit - Access now on-demand for only $19How to rebuild the economy after COVID-19 - Richard TurnbullA free-market agenda for rebuilding from the coronavirus - Henrik RasmussenSubscribe to Acton Institute Events podcast