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A Long Time In Finance

The Practicalities of Net Zero

Since 2019, Britain has put itself under a legal obligation to decarbonise its economy by 2050. But do people have any idea what that means, how practical it is and how much it might cost? To get an idea, Neil and Jonathan talked to Richard Halsey, innovation director at the Energy Supply Catapult about how the country is faring on its great decarbonisation crusade.


Presented by Jonathan Ford and Neil Collins.

With Richard Halsey.

Produced and edited by Nick Hilton for Podot.

In association with Briefcase.News

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