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Election Watch: The New Statesman podcast | daily throughout the UK general election

Why don't politicians care about happiness? With Richard Layard and Armando Iannucci | Westminster Reimagined

Thurrock is suffering major cuts to all its council services since it went effectively bankrupt last December, after hundreds of millions of pounds were put into risky investments that didn’t pay off. One of the services to be gravely affected by the cuts is a place called “Thameside”, an arts complex, described locally as a “mini Barbican”, which houses a theatre, library, archive and museum.


Places like Thameside often serve as the heart and soul of our communities. They bring people together, foster a sense of belonging, and contribute to our overall well-being. But what happens when these vital services face budget cuts?


In this episode of Westminster Reimagined we discuss The Good Life - how much value do we put on happiness in Britain? How can government policy boost happiness? And is it possible to quantify personal wellbeing? 


Listen to all previous episodes of Westminster Reimagined here: https://podfollow.com/westminster-reimagined-with-armando-iannucci-the-new-statesman


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