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cultureXchanges

Hank Willis Thomas: Universality x Art

Season 3, Ep. 2

Today on cultureXchanges, Meridian’s CEO Ambassador Stuart Holliday speaks with artist Hank Willis Thomas on how growing up in Washington, DC shaped his artistic vision, the theme of universality in his work, and what politicians could learn from the world of art criticism. Thomas lives and works in Brooklyn, New York as a conceptual artist working on themes related to perspective, identity, commodity, media, and popular culture. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and abroad including the International Center of Photography, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Hong Kong Arts Centre, the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, and the Rubell Museum here in Washington, DC. His collaborative projects include In Search of the Truth, The Writing on the Wall, and the For Freedoms Collective. He is also a member of the Public Design Commission for the City of New York.  

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