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Third Sector Podcast

Who’s most affected by the climate crisis?

Lucinda and Andy are joined by Jabeer Butt, chief executive of the Race Equality Foundation, to learn about how the climate crisis is disproportionately affecting already disadvantaged groups in the UK.

The discussion opens with a clip from a previous episode with the Wildlife Trusts' chief executive Craig Bennett, describing the interlinked nature of the climate and nature crises and economic and social issues.

Jabeer explains how some interventions to tackle environmental issues risk harming minority ethnic groups, citing the economic impact of London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone on minicab drivers.He draws on NPC’s Everyone’s Environment programme, which examines how minority ethnic groups, younger and older populations and people living with a disability are impacted by the climate crisis.

He suggests ways in which voluntary sector leaders can address the issue and calls for greater representation of minority groups in climate-related leadership and activism.

Later in the episode, Lucinda and Andy discuss recent examples of collective climate action in the sector, including a call by 92 charities for the Prime Minister to honour the government’s climate financing commitment and NCVO’s Fuelling Positive Change campaign.

Do you have stories of people whose lives have been transformed for the better thanks to your charity? If so, we’d like to hear them! All it takes is a short voice message to be featured on this podcast. Email lucinda.rouse@haymarket.com for further information.

Tell us what you think of the Third Sector Podcast! Please take five minutes to let us know how we can bring you the most relevant, useful content. To fill in the survey, click here.

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