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10 News First Person

Rising Together

It’s Mardi Gras time in Sydney. The theme this year is Rise, and after such a tough 12 months there is plenty to rise for, especially as this is one of the first major Pride events to be staged around the world since COVID-19 started. 

 

Kate Doak is a transgender woman living out and proud in Sydney and is passionate about ending transphobia and other forms of discrimination experienced by the LGBTIQ+ community. She is a freelance investigative journalist and news producer at Network 10 and is a strong advocate of mental health and LGBTIQ+ rights. 

 

She sits down with Narelda Jacobs for a frank, honest and open conversation about her journey. 

 

Please note that this episode contains content of a sensitive nature that may be upsetting to some listeners.

 

If you, or anyone you know, are affected by any of the issues raised in this podcast, please don’t go it alone.  


Please reach out to any of the following: 

Lifeline - 13 11 14 

Twenty10 - 02 8594 9555 

Aboriginal Counselling – 0410 539 905 


Produced by Ali Aitken

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